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Election messing could derail growth, businesses warn

Exports and new recruits drove businesses forward at the end of 2014, but political point-scoring ahead of the election could derail business growth, says the British Chambers of Commerce (BCC).

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Exports and new recruits drove businesses forward at the end of 2014, but political point-scoring ahead of the election could derail business growth, says the British Chambers of Commerce (BCC).

People

Election messing could derail growth, businesses warn

Exports and new recruits drove businesses forward at the end of 2014, but political point-scoring ahead of the election could derail business growth, says the British Chambers of Commerce (BCC).

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Exports and new recruits drove businesses forward at the end of 2014, but political point-scoring ahead of the election could derail business growth, says the British Chambers of Commerce (BCC).

The organisation’s Quarterly Economic Survey, published today, shows that firms in both the manufacturing and services industries experienced strong growth in domestic and export markets during the last three months of the year.

The balance of businesses trying to recruit new staff members was at an all-time high during the period, according to the major survey of 7,000 businesses.

John Longworth, director general of the BCC, said: “British businesses are well placed to grow in 2015 – a testament to their hard-work and resilience. It is particularly pleasing to see the manufacturing sector bounce back, despite signs of a slowdown in recent months.

He added: “However we must aim for growth that is sustainable for the long-term, rather than settle for second best.

“With employment and investment intentions at historically high levels, businesses are gearing up for a big year in 2015. It is now vitally important that firms are able to convert their growth ambitions into reality.”

Longworth added that the UK continued to face “obstacles”, which would be exacerbated in 2015 by the general election in May.

It is thought the election will be one of the closest in history, with key battlegrounds being the economy and the National Health Service (NHS).

“Businesses are bouncing back, but their optimism may not last if political point scoring outweighs sound economic policies,” said Longworth.

“It is imperative that all political parties use the forthcoming election campaign to outline their plans to support long-term business growth and investment.”

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Election messing could derail growth, businesses warn

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